Get A Closer Look: What To Look For When Buying Monoculars!
What exactly should you look for when purchasing a monocular? Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Get A Closer Look: What To Look For When Buying Monoculars!

2 min read
What exactly should you look for when purchasing a monocular? Here are a few things to keep in mind.

You've seen them in the movies and on TV. Those nifty little gadgets that spies and detectives use to get a closer look at things. They're called monoculars and can be a valuable tool for shooters and hunters alike.

But what exactly should you look for when purchasing a monocular? Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Power

One of the most important things to consider when purchasing a monocular is power, measured in magnification. Most monoculars have a magnification of anywhere from 6x to 10x, which is plenty for most applications.

But if you need something with more power, you can find monoculars with magnifications up to 20x. Keep in mind that the higher the power, the more difficult it will be to hold the monocular steady.

Objective Lens Diameter

The objective lens is the large front lens of the monocular through which you view your subject. The size of this lens is measured in millimeters (mm), and the larger the lens, the more light it will gather.

This is important because more light means a brighter image, which is especially useful when viewing in low-light conditions. Most monoculars have an objective lens diameter between 20mm and 42mm.

Field of View

The field of view (FOV) is how much area you can see through the monocular at any given time, and it's measured in feet at 1,000 yards.

A wider field of view means you can take in more of your surroundings at once, which can be helpful when trying to find someone or something specific in a large area. Most monoculars have a FOV of between 220 and 430 feet at 1,000 yards.

Weight and Size

Monoculars come in all shapes and sizes, but smaller isn't always better. Yes, a smaller monocular will be easier to carry around, but it will also have the less light-gathering capability and be more difficult to hold steady.

On the other hand, a large monocular will be heavier and bulkier but will provide a brighter image that's easier to keep steady. The best bet is to find something small enough to be easily portable but large enough to give a clear image.

Prisms

Monoculars typically use one of two prisms - Roof or Porro - to reflect light and create an image. Roof prisms are cheaper to manufacture but tend to produce darker images than Porro prisms.

Porro prisms are slightly bulkier but usually provide brighter images with sharper details. So, if the price isn't an issue, go with Porro prisms. But if you're on a budget, roof prisms will do just fine.

Conclusion

Purchasing a monocular may seem daunting, but if you know what to look for, it can be relatively straightforward and even fun!

Remember to keep power (magnification), objective lens diameter, the field of view, weight and size, and type of prism in mind when making your decision, and you're sure to find the perfect monocular for your needs!

So, what are you waiting for?

Thank you for reading!

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